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  • »AneWildStitches« ist der Autor dieses Themas

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Registrierungsdatum: 14. April 2014

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1

Freitag, 18. April 2014, 12:11

Mundlos original-Victoria Klasse 125-15-Z

Hallo
Habe gerade für eine Mitnähwerkstatt eine Mundlos original -Victoria Klasse 125-15-Z erstanden.
Beim austesten hat mein Mann falschrum am Rad gedreht und seit dem tut sich garnichts mehr. Das Gestänge steht still. Und man kann das Ding nicht wirklich aufmachen, wie zum Geier haben die die Mechanik da überhaupt rein bekommen?
Was kann ich machen?
Kann mir jemand ein allgemeines Reparaturbuch empfehlen? Gibt es Reparaturanleitungen für diese spezielle Nähmaschine und andere und wo bekommt man die?
Danke erst mal
AneWildstitches

ZwirnIstGut

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  • »ZwirnIstGut« ist männlich

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Registrierungsdatum: 24. Oktober 2016

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2

Montag, 24. Oktober 2016, 19:14

Bin gerade auch an einer Victoria Modell ZZ-245 um die wieder zum Laufen zu bringen. Habe einiges über Victoria gefunden. Aber keine Bedienungsanleitungen. Vielleicht kann ich helfen.

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3

Montag, 24. Oktober 2016, 22:20

It can take time to track down the correct service manual for some models, but there are manuals for similar machines out there. If I'm correct, you have a straight stitcher with a bobbin case you take out and put in like a Bernina or a Singer model 15 ( or clam shell type?). A bit of general knowledge is usually enough to restore a straight stitch model.

The general way about it is to unscrew face plate and needle plate, take out the bobbin case and clean out any lint and thread you might find. Get as much dust out as you can before you start oiling. You can with advantage speed up the cleaning process by flushing out joints and gears with a type of spray can oil (like CRC5-56 or Weldtite TF2 with teflon). Don't use anything but regular sewing machine oil later on, if you want to be fancy and hightech use Finish Line Ceramic Wet Lube or Triflow from a bottle, they are nice and with teflon. I haven't come across others worthwhile. Be wary of oils with lots of additives, sticky and gooey consistency, the simpler the better is generally the best way about it.

If it's stuck or runs very slugish you might have to repeat oiling a few times a day and turn the mechanism a bit The most thorough way to get smooth running smooth and well behaved again is to start using the machine and keep up a diligent cleaning and oiling routine. Be prepared for a few rounds of cleaning and oiling before you get where you want to be. To begin with dark and murky oil will probably seep out; as the oil reach the inners of joints and gears old grime dissolves. Use oil on all mechanical parts, except for the bearings on the electrical motor, it needs grease. Along the way you gradually clean out all dirt and grime, and you detect any issues preventing it from sewing as well as it should. These old machines tend to stitch flawlessly on any fabric and are a joy to work on.

Half the job to begin with is detecting oil points; all gears and joints where metal touches metal needs oil. Turn the hand wheel as you inspect under the base, behing the face plate, there are oil points for the hand wheel and stop motion screw. Be careful with the black finish, it's shellac and it can be cleaned carefully and if its in good condition polished with a resin type care polish.

With a bit of time and effort spent on it, I know it will run and sew again :- )

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 2 mal editiert, zuletzt von »arrow« (25. Oktober 2016, 00:15)


ZwirnIstGut

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4

Dienstag, 25. Oktober 2016, 11:32

hello arrow,

thanks for your reply and sharing your knowlegde.

My problem is the 'Handwheel' from the Victoria ZZ245.

This Handwheel is from plastic and this plastic got small and greater cracks in the material. The plastic brittle in the course of time.

So the Handwheel is not more a full circle and therefore the toothbelt stucks and then slips.
Transport then is awful. The electric motor without toothbelt works well.

The problem: Find a lot of handwheels spare part from other sewing machines. But in all descriptions they only give the model where it fore, but NOT the dimensions. So I can not compare with the cracked handwheel.

Do you have any idea?

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Dienstag, 25. Oktober 2016, 19:36

It's difficult with less common brands and models, but not impossible. I know some have made their own parts, but it requires access to a lathe machine, and knowledge of how to use it. Some plastics can be sort of chisled out, some use aluminum and paint it the right color. I was lucky once, and a guy made me a aluminium pulley as replacment for a part on an Elna Supermatic.

Some have managed to glue nylon parts back toghether, but you need a bit of luck for it to work, and the right glue. There are substances you can use to fill in cracks and chips in phenolic type plastics (hand wheels often are hard phenol type). If your Victoria ZZ245 is a very nice model it's worth the effort of finding parts and ways about it. It can take time, months and years in the worst case (money can buy you out of any situation). If it turns out difficult or expensive and your Victora isn't a special case, it's easier and cheaper to get another machine. Some models are just not worth it unless you like them a lot. 1960s and 70s Necchi machines were once highly regarded, but they almost always have a cracked cam stack, the same for the motor pulley and bobbin winding mechanism. I just pass by them and look for the more durable 1950s build. My point is, you have to decide which machines are worth the effort.

You can still get replacment gears for lots of Singer models, most older Bernina and Elna machines. Some types of plastic have held up better over time than others, and the new replacement parts are usually better quality. Most Bernias I have seen still run fine with all original gears even 50 or 60 years later, so I guess some producers were more lucky with their plastic materials than others.

The old all metal machines are well worth spending time and money on, they will last a lifte time once fixed up and can handle any job you throw at them.

I too hunt down parts from other machines. You could always contact sellers and ask a question or two. Closely related models often used a lot of the same parts, it can be worth taking a chance. I'm sure you are all onto it though. It might sound like I have a house full of machines, but I have a Singer 201, an old Elna and are trying to fix up a 1950s Phoenix zigzagger. The others are passed on to new owners. I guess I only need one machine, but I will keep two, a nice vintage model and maybe get a modern overlock machine.

I wish my German was better, I would love to replay to your posts in the same language :- )

Regards

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 5 mal editiert, zuletzt von »arrow« (26. Oktober 2016, 15:08)


ZwirnIstGut

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Mittwoch, 26. Oktober 2016, 11:42

Hello arrow!!!

I also think in the same way - I will repair the handwheel. On a close look to the (broken) parts it would be possible to glue.

The other way is to build a mould to make your own spare parts. I do not know if the (huge) effort will be worth it. I think only when more people need the same handwheel.

...its only the femals in our family like this sewing machine.

I'ill keep you informed.

greetings

ZwirnIstGut

BTW. Do you have started once lerning German?

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Mittwoch, 26. Oktober 2016, 15:20

I guess a mould could be made and liquid plastic could be poored into it. I'm not sure if it is as easy as plaster of paris, but I guess it's basically the same method. They make rubber face masks this way, maybe there's a way with the hard high density plastic too.

If you know someone with a lathe machine it's not too difficult. The problem is mostly the cost to go into a work shop and pay someone to measure the part and turn out a plastic or aluminium version of it. These days there are computerised lathe machines, or machines that sort of chisels out parts. The cost vary a lot, and isn't always reasonable or worth it. You can be lucky though.

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